Creeping weed discovery

Cessnock City Council’s Weeds Officers are asking locals to keep an eye out for the pesky Paraguay burr weed, which has been discovered in our region. 

Cessnock City Council’s Weeds Officers are asking locals to keep an eye out for the pesky Paraguay burr weed, which has been discovered in our region.

Paraguay burr (or Acanthospermum austral) is native to South America and the Caribbean and is a creeping plant that can often emerge on roadsides, footpaths, gardens and waste areas.

This weed is commonly spread by its ‘burrs’ becoming attached to animals, clothing and vehicles, but seeds and stem fragments may also be spread by soil, water, mowers and other road maintenance activities.  

This species was first recorded in south-eastern Queensland in 1994, yet it has now been widely naturalised in districts of Central NSW between the Hunter Valley and Wollongong.  

Paraguay burr is usually easily recognised by its hooked burrs and creeping stems that can form dense mats of vegetation. The younger stems are green and hairy, while older stems tend to be woody in nature.  

You can play an important role in stopping the spread of this invasive weed, so if you see it around, contact Cessnock City Council’s Weeds Officers on 4993 4100.  

For more information on weed management in our region, visit www.cessnock.nsw.gov.au/environment/weeds. 

 6/16/2017