Cessnock City Council bitterly disappointed

Cessnock City Council has been left bitterly disappointed after the NSW Government revealed access to the Cessnock Correctional facility will remain the same despite the 1000 bed expansion.  

Cessnock City Council has been left bitterly disappointed after the NSW Government revealed access to the Cessnock Correctional facility will remain the same despite the 1000 bed expansion.

Cessnock City Mayor, Councillor Bob Pynsent slammed the decision which will see Lindsay Street, Cessnock, continue to be used as the main entrance point to the prison.

“The Review of Environmental Factors in no way addressed the increased traffic that will inevitably be generated by the expansion of the facility, which will make Cessnock home to the largest prison in New South Wales”.

“I know local residents will share my outrage. At the community meeting held in August the sentiment of the community was resoundingly in support of closing the Lindsay Street entrance”.

“Not only is it concerning the major entrance for such a large facility is in a residential area but that Cessnock rates payers are being forced to foot the bill of road wear and tear which is a direct result of a NSW Government facility”.

“The report held Lindsay Street is sufficient to handle the additional traffic. It is hard to believe the increased traffic will have no impact on local roads”, Cr Pynsent said.

Following Cessnock City Council’s overwhelming objection to the report, which failed to address traffic concerns, a commitment was sought from Corrective Services NSW.

Cessnock City Mayor, Cr Pynsent said he has secured a commitment from Corrective Services NSW that Lindsay Street will not remain the major access road to the complex.

“Until this commitment is honoured Council will continue to stand up for the Cessnock community to ensure we get our fair share”.

“Why should our ratepayers pay for roadworks for a state facility, State roads should service state projects”, Cr Pynsent said.