Wildlife legend Tim Faulkner pays a visit to our bushland

Cessnock City Council launched a campaign to raise awareness about the significance of our local bushland and just last week Tim Faulkner came out to discover the unique wildlife within. 

Cessnock City Council launched a campaign to raise awareness about the significance of our local bushland and just last week Tim Faulkner came out to discover the unique wildlife within.  

Tim Faulkner is the General Manager and Head of Conservation at the Australian Reptile Park in Somersby and the Devil Ark at Barrington Tops. He also has his own show on National Geographic, ‘The Wild Life of Tim Faulkner’.

Wrestling crocodiles, wrangling Taipans and milking Funnel-web spiders is all in a day’s work for Tim, yet this passionate conservationist took time out of his busy schedule to explore and capture footage of our local bushland.  

Tim teamed up with Mick Roderick from BirdLife Australia to produce two short films, one to highlight the significance of the area to potential visitors and the other to show the impact of illegal dumping and logging.  

On the day of filming, there was a small flock of endangered Swift Parrots happily feeding in the trees, making the experience all the more special.  

“Spending the morning exploring the bushland and finding a flock of endangered Swift Parrots was a great experience and the people of Cessnock are fortunate to have this on their doorstep,” said Tim.  

“The bushland around Cessnock is unique because it is a remnant of what once covered the floor of the Hunter Valley. There is so much crucial habitat for rare and endangered wildlife and it is fantastic that Council is getting behind the awareness-raising through the ‘Our Bushland’ project,” added Tim.  

The films will be released later this month on Council’s Facebook page and website. Visit www.cessnock.nsw.gov.au/OurBushland for more information.  

This campaign seeks to educate residents about our local bushland and has been made possible by funding from the NSW Government through its Environmental Trust.  

Council would also like to acknowledge BirdLife Australia, Office of Environment & Heritage, Hunter Local Land Services, Saving our Species, National Parks & Wildlife Service and Hunter Bird Observers Club. 

 7/4/2018