Controlling local Camphor Laurel

Last week, Cessnock City Council commenced the removal of Camphor Laurel trees from key sites in Abermain and Swamp Creek, with the help of a $13,000 grant from Hunter Local Land Services. 

Last week, Cessnock City Council commenced the removal of Camphor Laurel trees from key sites in Abermain and Swamp Creek, with the help of a $13,000 grant from Hunter Local Land Services.

This Camphor Laurel Containment Project forms part of Hunter Local Land Services Regional Strategic Weeds Program which focuses on managing weed biosecurity risks across the region.

While Camphor Laurel trees may appear to be beautiful and shady, they are actually very invasive and tend to inhibit large areas of land, replacing pasture and native vegetation, much like lantana.

Camphor Laurel, or Cinnamomum camphora, is native to Taiwan, Japan and parts of China, but was introduced to Australia in the 1800s and has since become an environmental weed.

Because its high volume of seeds are spread by birds, the trees readily establish along riparian zones of creeks and waterways, as well as along fences and under powerlines, which has become a major problem for many local authorities.

Conservationists are also concerned about competition between Camphor Laurel and native vegetation and the possible exclusion of regenerating native rainforests. 

Cessnock City Council’s Weeds Control Staff are pleased with the outcome of this project so far and look forward to seeing the improvement to these two areas, including the regeneration and return of the local native flora and fauna.

“Camphor Laurel trees are long-lived, with some being over 100 years old and these mature trees are usually large and expensive to remove, which is why we were pleased to receive funding to carry out this project,” said Council’s Weeds Coordinator, Barry Shepherd.

Cessnock City Council will continue to work in partnership with Hunter Local Land Services to manage problem weeds across the region. 

 8/18/2017