Biosecurity Act 2015 now in action

Cessnock City Council is reminding residents the Biosecurity Act 2015 commenced on 1 July 2017 and is set to provide a more effective framework for managing biosecurity risks.

Cessnock City Council is reminding residents the Biosecurity Act 2015 commenced on 1 July 2017 and is set to provide a more effective framework for managing biosecurity risks.

The new legislation was adopted following extensive public consultation and was passed in September 2015 to replace all or part of 14 Acts addressing biosecurity issues.    

Local landholders are encouraged to get themselves up to date with the new legislation, which is expected to enable better management of biosecurity risks that impact on our economy, environment and the community.  

Cessnock City Council’s, Weeds Coordinator Barry Shepherd said the new legislation covers a broad range of areas and is urging Cessnock landholders to familiarise themselves with the changes.  

“Unlike the repealed Noxious Weed Act 1993, the new legislation does not discriminate between land managers, public or private. All land managers have the same responsibility to manage biosecurity risks and impacts of invasive weed species.”  

“The new Act manages biosecurity risks from animal and plant pests and diseases, to weeds and contaminants”.  

“If our community educates itself on these risks we are better able to minimise the impacts of them on our environment.”  

Cessnock City Council’s, Ranger Team Leader, Kurt Livens advises “The Act covers everything from straying stock and regulation of the poultry, cattle, sheep, and goat industries.”  

For more information simple facts sheets can be found online at http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/biosecurity-legislation/factsheets or visit http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/biosecurity/biosecurity-legislation.

 7/17/2017